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Conducting a Successful Hazard Analysis

Submitted by bindu.chauhan on Tue, 11/29/2022 - 22:01

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Row of lockers showing safety suits

In 2019, there were more than 5,000 worker fatalities in the US according to OSHA. That equates to an average of 100+ deaths a week or nearly 15 deaths every day. Supply chain incidents do happen, but they can be prevented.  

Conducting regular hazard analyses is fundamental for businesses to stay proactive on emerging risks within their businesses.  

Where to start?  

Employees can be your greatest asset when developing a successful hazard analysis as they’re the ones who understand best the day-to-day tasks and the issues that may arise. Furthermore, having employees own their safety management creates a level of accountability and could show better results.  

Putting together a hazard analysis can seem like a challenging task—that’s why we partnered with safety thought leader, Tim Page-Bottorff CSP, of CIT to put together an in-depth guide on how to go about it.  

Let’s get started on your journey for a successful hazard analysis. 

What is a hazard analysis? 

A hazard analysis uses various techniques to evaluate possible job- or task-related risks before they occur. During a hazard analysis, employees or management will analyze every supplier, worksite or machinery to identify existing hazards and eliminate conditional and operational changes that create these hazards. 

The best way to go about a hazard analysis is to develop a framework that lays down a set of guiding principles that can be followed in a step-by-step approach: 

  1. Pre-analysis This step involves preparing for the main analysis while setting expectations based on previous risk factors, records, and guidelines. 

  1. Historical review: analyzing previous injuries, illness, accidents, and close-calls at the company. 

  1. Employee involvement: involves open communication with employees about tasks and encourages their participation.  

  1. Ensure compliance with regulatory authorities: incorporating local and global regulatory requirements like OSHA 29CFR1910.132 and ISO 45001. 

  1. Set priorities: prioritizing specific jobs or areas for the analysis, which can save time and narrow down expectations. 

  1. Hazard Analysis This step is the actual analysis, where comprehensive insights are gathered and used to prevent hazards.  

  1. Break the job into steps: breaking tasks down into steps and recording them ensure they’re later reviewed and measure appropriately. 

  1. Hazard identification: laying out potential risk factors, probable errors, and their consequences for each hazard. 

  1. The hierarchy of control and control measures: utilizing hierarchy of control for hazards to determine where the hazard occurs, and the workers involved. This step also includes training and awareness on proper hazard controls, hazard substitutions, and protective gear/tactics.     

  1. Hazard review and elimination: reviewing identified hazards with the employees as appropriate for their respective jobs. 

  1. Post-analysis safeguards This final step comprises utilizing the insights gathered from the analysis to implement viable hazard prevention measures. 

  1. Apply prescribed changes: Using the insights gathered from the analysis, management can take preventive measures, such as securing unsafe conditions and processes and properly training workers on new, recommended safety workflows.  

  1. Review hazard parameters: periodically review the findings from the job hazard analysis to identify any risks that have been missed or ones that may manifest later to avoid any mishaps. 

How Avetta can help 

At Avetta, we provide a personalized platform for your business to achieve hazard-prevention success—with technology and staff to help you identify, track, and improve hazards in your supply chain. With Avetta’s comprehensive verification and assessment services, including the Avetta Risk Assessment Tool and Avetta One, companies can verify whether supplier safety controls and policies are up-to-date and compare established policies and procedures against accident and hazard investigation forms and training logs to ensure proper controls are implemented.  

Avetta’s solutions help companies make smarter decisions faster by leveraging predictive capabilities and automated distribution of key reports and dashboards, resulting in improved performance and safety. 

To learn more about worker safety management download the full guide, visit our website, or call 844-633-3801 

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Exploring the Importance of Supplier Sustainability

Submitted by bindu.chauhan on Thu, 11/10/2022 - 23:23

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Exploring the Importance of Supplier Sustainability

Over the last few years, the shift in expectations of both investors and consumers has brought sustainability reporting to the forefront of corporate strategies and board room agendas. Institutional investors are increasingly emphasizing the importance of non-financial metrics, such as sustainability data.

Understandably, the emphasis on quantifiable sustainability practices has found its way into core supply chain function – primarily, procurement. As a result, more companies, across industries and revenue brackets, have enforced their resolve to work with suppliers that adhere to sustainable social and environmental practices.

A Call for Sustainable Supply Chains

According to the CDP Global Supply Chain Report 2020, supply chain emissions account for 92% of an organization’s total greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. On average supply chain emissions are 11.4 times higher than operational emissions. On the global stage, supply chains account for 60% of all emissions.

The simple truth is achieving supply chain sustainability is a key factor when it comes to overcoming the festering global climate change crisis. The only way for enterprises to make a difference in this regard is to implement environmental, societal, and governance (ESG) measures at each supply chain touchpoint, starting with procurement of sustainable suppliers and vendors.

But implementing a sustainable supply chain strategy involves a numerous consideration around a largely complex business ecosystem. This is often a challenge for enterprises, given the difficulty in accumulating the required data to set clear prequalifying targets and standards when onboarding suppliers. And the fragmented nature of the supplier landscape adds to the concern – especially given the possibility of non-sustainable practices being buried several supplier tiers deep.

Supplier Sustainability Framework: A Technology-led Solution

A supplier procurement framework is foundational for enterprises to create strong, reliable supply chains. And given the business relevance of sustainable practices and the critical role that supply chains play, the need for a sustainable supplier procurement framework cannot be overstated. “2019 Gartner Procurement’s Value Contribution in Supply Chain Survey data shows that 75% of participating organizations reported having a formalized sustainable procurement program in place.”

However, in most cases, the lack of end-to-end supplier visibility impedes the effective implementation of such a framework. This results in several limitations especially when enforcing compliance standards across multi-tiered supplier ecosystems.

Fortunately, the widespread digitization of supply chains has paved the way for technological intervention in the effective implementation of a supplier sustainability framework. “Supplier sustainability applications help companies assess and monitor suppliers’ ESG performance to reduce risk exposure and drive improvements.” Supplier sustainability applications have been growing in significance too. By aggregating and leveraging supplier data from across various touchpoints an interconnected ecosystem and decentralizing compliance ownerships, these applications can help enterprises eliminate non-sustainable practices from the supply chain. The result: a responsible, efficient, and reliable supply chain, safe from unprecedented risks.

To gain a deeper understanding of why supplier sustainability applications are the future of resilient supply chains, you can sign up to view the full 2022 Gartner® Report “Market Guide for Supplier Sustainability Applications” here.

*Report Source: Gartner, Market Guide for Supplier Sustainability Applications. Miguel Cossio, Laura Reiner. Published 1st June, 2022 **GARTNER is a registered trademark and service mark of Gartner, Inc. and/or its affiliates in the U.S. and internationally and is used here in with permission. All rights reserved.

Gartner does not endorse any vendor, product or service depicted in its research publications, and does not advise technology users to select only those vendors with the highest ratings or other designation. Gartner research publications consist of the opinions of Gartner’s research organization and should not be construed as statements of fact. Gartner disclaims all warranties, expressed or implied, with respect to this research, including any warranties of merchantability or fitness for a particular purpose.

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Overcoming the Barriers to Supplier Sustainability

Submitted by bhupendra.rajp… on Thu, 11/03/2022 - 06:46

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Overcoming the Barriers to Supplier Sustainability

In the world of business, sustainability is a term broadly used to indicate the environmental impacts of operations and products. But from a supply chain perspective, the importance of sustainability extends beyond “going green”. Besides being environmentally woke, sustainable supply chains are socially responsible and ensure more reliable operations and, therefore, improved cashflow. Building a supply chain around a supplier sustainability framework has multiple benefits to its credit.

A network of sustainable suppliers ensures better productivity and reduces the risk of financial loss (through penalties for non-compliance) and reputational damage. Sustainable practices also help enterprises enhance efficiency with significant cost savings. Now, the growing investor- and board-level focus sustainable practices in the supply chain has made its way into supply chain decision-making process. “2019 Gartner Procurement’s Value Contribution in Supply Chain Survey data shows that 75% of participating organizations reported having a formalized sustainable procurement program in place.”

But establishing a supplier sustainability program is easier said than executed; especially given the large, complex, and often fragmented nature of modern supply chains.

The Challenges of Ensuring Supplier Sustainability

While the importance of supplier sustainability cannot be overstated, the challenges around implementing an effective framework to ensure it can often seem overwhelming. Sustainability is a fairly new agenda and legacy enterprises often find it difficult to navigate their own largely non-sustainable practices. Beside a general lack of awareness often tends to leave gaping holes in the supplier sustainability program. Combine that with the magnitude and complexity of modern supply chains that hinder visibility and we’ve got an enterprise-level challenge on our hands.

There are three key challenge areas when it comes to implementing a supplier sustainability program:

  • Increase costs: 38% of enterprises believe that increased are the single biggest hurdle on their path to supplier sustainability. On the other hand, global environmental supply chain risks are expected to cost businesses $120 billion by the year 2026.
  • Lack of visibility in complex supply chains: This is the second most cited challenge in establishing supplier sustainability. It is often difficult for enterprises to monitor the large number of inter-dependencies and varying degree sustainability maturities across such a supplier network. In case of sustainability measures, a lack of overall awareness adds a layer of complexity.
  • Mindsets and cultures: For incumbent enterprises, introducing new ideas – such as sustainability – is often met by resistance and subsequent non-compliance. Without a strong monitoring framework in place, the efficacy of a supplier sustainability framework will falter.

Supplier Sustainability Applications

It is no secret that enterprises that hope to establish supplier sustainability must overcome a complex and largely fragmented supplier ecosystem in terms of capabilities and focus areas. This is an especially difficult task given that many businesses rely on spreadsheets and manual processes to track and measure this data. Fortunately, technology has an answer.

“Supplier sustainability applications help companies assess and monitor suppliers’ ESG performance to reduce risk exposure and drive improvements.” Through effective use, a supplier sustainability application can prove to be a powerful tool in optimizing supplier networks, especially in the long run. These applications are capable of aggregating and leveraging supplier data from across various touchpoints an interconnected ecosystem and decentralizing compliance ownerships. In turn, they allow enterprises to prequalify their suppliers by accounting for the multifarious aspects of sustainability – insurance, risk, compliance, and more.

As a result, enterprises can begin to establish increasingly sustainable practices and build a supply chain that is reliable and responsible, without having to bear a massive cost burden.

To gain a deeper understanding of why supplier sustainability applications are the future of resilient supply chains, you can sign up to view the full 2022 Gartner® Report “Market Guide for Supplier Sustainability Applications” here.

*Report Source: Gartner, Market Guide for Supplier Sustainability Applications. Miguel Cossio, Laura Reiner. Published 1st June, 2022 **GARTNER is a registered trademark and service mark of Gartner, Inc. and/or its affiliates in the U.S. and internationally and is used here in with permission. All rights reserved.

Gartner does not endorse any vendor, product or service depicted in its research publications, and does not advise technology users to select only those vendors with the highest ratings or other designation. Gartner research publications consist of the opinions of Gartner’s research organization and should not be construed as statements of fact. Gartner disclaims all warranties, expressed or implied, with respect to this research, including any warranties of merchantability or fitness for a particular purpose.

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Starting the Net Zero Journey: Actionable Steps for Construction Managers

Submitted by bhupendra.rajp… on Sun, 10/23/2022 - 23:09

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Starting the Net Zero Journey

For companies who’ve decided to initiate zero-waste policies at their firms, the first step can be the hardest one to take. This is an industry built heavily on routine and repetition, and breaking from the norm can be difficult, even if it is to create a more eco-friendly, sustainable future.

Today, we’re taking a look at how to apply these strategies as you move forward. From existing and in-motion projects to ones you haven’t started yet, we’ll share how to jump in and get started the right way.

Start With a Waste Minimization Plan

A waste minimization plan acts as an inventory and waste monitoring system that can set your construction business up for success. A well-defined plan will contain the following elements:

Defining Goals and Strategies

The first step is to define the goals you want to set around waste minimization and recycling, and the steps you’ll take to get there. Especially if you’re just starting out on this journey, you’ll be mostly referencing existing frameworks and using them to visualize a best-case scenario.

The more you read and learn about projects that are similar to yours in scope and size, the more ideas you’ll be able to incorporate into your own plan. These strategies don’t have to be perfect right now, but it’s important to get them down on paper so you know how to begin.

You’ll also include data tracking and management goals within the plan, so you can use the results of your current project to inform your next one and make it even stronger.

Assessing Local Inventory

It’s important to know which materials are available for reuse or recycling throughout the project. This requires taking a local inventory of not only the materials at the job site but also off-site.

Research what’s available in the community where you’re building, and reach out to public and private resources that can act as third-party material reusers or resellers. Sometimes, location will dictate how feasible this step will be. If there isn’t a local recipient available to take excess waste, the amount of carbon generated by flying that waste elsewhere can offset the intent.

Develop Methods for Tracking Tonnage and Volume

Residential construction companies need concrete methods for tracking the material impact of their activities. This also helps in the costing aspect of each job.

If you’re utilizing third-party services to pick up or transport materials, analyzing these metrics can also help you ensure that your billing and reporting activities are accurate. Scheduling and facilitating these services can be one of the most challenging aspects of waste management and materials management in general, but it’s critical as you make strides toward a zero-waste project.

Define Diversion Channels by Region

Regardless of the specified waste stream (reusable, recyclable, salvageable), there are usually 5 to 10 different innovative ways that construction companies can repurpose and reuse those components.

For instance, items that can be easily removed, such as doors, hardware, and appliances, can be salvaged for donation or used on other jobs. Other common diversion channels include:

  • Wood cutoffs: Use when full-length lumber isn’t necessary (e.g. cripples, lintels, blocking)
  • Scrap wood: Chip on-site and use as a ground cover
  • Gypsum: De-paper, crush, and use as a soil amendment in small quantities
  • Brick, concrete, masonry: Recycle on-site and use as subbase material, fill, or driveway bedding
  • Insulation: Use excess from exterior walls to deaden noise in interior walls
  • Packaging materials: Return unused materials to suppliers for reuse

You can contact regional municipal and green regulatory bodies to maximize your on-site diversion efforts. These entities already have connections, and may already have preferred vendor lists for you to review.

One area of special consideration: Pay close attention to the way your firm uses and repurposes cardboard, especially as items are now being shipped further distances. By volume, wood, drywall, and cardboard make up 60% to 80% of all construction waste. Thankfully, it’s one of the easiest materials to recycle, so you should be able to find a participating program near your job site.

Other Considerations

Other considerations that should be included in your waste minimization plan include:

  • Methods for managing hazardous materials
  • Processes to measure the expected quality grade of each material waste stream
  • Processes for collecting, storing, and hauling materials
  • Methods to educate and train the team on zero-waste policies
  • The estimated cost of implementing the plan and the savings you expect

Maximizing Your Net-Zero Program

A zero-waste program touches on many different aspects of ESG. As you begin working with your contractors, suppliers, and vendors to begin formulating a waste minimization plan, think about the priorities you’re setting and begin to work those into your procurement considerations.

You can leverage technology platforms to connect with sustainability-compliant suppliers that share your vision.

This way, you’ll only connect with stakeholders that are already familiar with these types of initiatives, and may even be able to bring their own resources to the table.

To get the word out, develop a communication strategy that outlines how you’ll share your zero-waste commitment with existing and new supply chain partners. You can also integrate this plan into your current and future marketing efforts, so your goals become synonymous with your brand.

Interested in learning more about what a zero-waste future looks like in the residential construction industry? Check out our recent webinar: Strategies for Zero Waste in Residential Construction. You can download and view the webinar in full online!

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