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Top 10 Most Dangerous Jobs in Canada

By Avetta Marketing
May 04, 2022
9 minutes
Top 10 Most Dangerous Jobs in Canada

No matter which country you’re in, there are sure to be a handful of high-risk industries that keep the economy going. To get a better understanding of how that applies to the Canadian job market, Avetta dove into the data. We ranked the top 10 most dangerous jobs in Canada according to total lost time claims (injuries and illnesses but not fatalities). 

To get an accurate ranking, we evaluated the most dangerous industries in Canada from 2017-2019. We took the number of each industry’s total lost time claims and divided it by the total number of workers in that industry. 

We then discuss the most dangerous jobs within those industries, why the industry is so dangerous, and what safety regulations Canada has in place to protect workers. 

Finally, we talk a bit about how the COVID-19 pandemic changed the ranking of some of Canada’s industries in 2020 and how Avetta can help protect your industry’s supply chain. 

10. Mining, Quarrying and Oil & Gas Extraction

You may think this industry would place much higher on the list of most dangerous jobs in Canada. The fact it comes in at number 10 attests to the high level of safety adherence these industries apply to their everyday work.

These are some of the most dangerous jobs within these industries:

  • Mining machine operation
  • Underground mining
  • Offshore deck operations 
  • Offshore drilling

Here are the Canadian safety regulations and guidelines for mining, quarrying and oil and gas extraction:

9. Accommodation and Foodservice

This industry may not seem too dangerous at first thought, but the high occurrence of open wounds, burns and hepatitis gives it a place on the top 10 list. 

These are some of the most dangerous jobs within these industries:

  • Hotel work (cleaning)
  • Food preparation
  • Food safety and inspection
  • Delivery driving
  • Offshore accommodations

Here are the Canadian safety regulations and guidelines for accommodation and food service:

8. Administrative and Support, Waste Management and Remediation Services

Using heavy equipment, handling hazardous materials and experiencing road accidents all contribute to perilous conditions for these workers.

These are some of the most dangerous jobs within these industries:

  • Refuse and recyclable material collection
  • Water and wastewater treatment plant and system operation

Here are the Canadian safety regulations and guidelines for waste management:

7. Other Services (Except Public Administration)

Employees in other services—a catch-all category that includes a variety of occupations that don’t fit neatly into existing categorisations—mostly suffer from traumatic injuries to their bones, nerves, spinal cord, muscles, ligaments and tendons.

These are some of the most dangerous jobs in this industry:

  • Religious administration and promotion
  • Advocacy
  • Dry cleaning and laundry services
  • Death care
  • Pet care

Here are the Canadian safety regulations and guidelines for other services:

6. Public Administration

Though it’s typically a “desk job,” working in public administration comes with its own challenges. Mental disorders and syndromes among these employees are common. Surprisingly, traumatic injuries to bones, nerves and the spinal cord also happen.

These are some of the most dangerous jobs in the industry:

  • Veterans health administration
  • Customs and border patrol
  • Military
  • Canadian Air Transport Security Authority (CATSA)

Here are the Canadian safety regulations and guidelines for public administration:

5. Manufacturing

Environmental conditions, hard labor, and repetitive movements affect worker health and safety. Common injuries are surface wounds and open wounds, burns and intracranial trauma (brain injury). Often not considered or realized, manufacturers also regularly get diagnosed with digestive diseases and disorders.

These are some of the most dangerous jobs within the industry:

  • Industrial truck operations
  • Fabricating 
  • Packaging
  • Plastics and rubber production
  • Industrial chemical production

Here are the Canadian safety regulations and guidelines for manufacturing:

4. Healthcare and Social Assistance

Daily person-to-person contact and biological exposure are real threats to the health of employees in this industry. Additionally, surface wounds, intracranial injuries, musculoskeletal pain and mental disorders or syndromes occur frequently. 

These are some of the most dangerous jobs within these industries:

  • Nursing
  • Paramedic services
  • Correctional medicine
  • In-patient psychiatry

Here are the Canadian safety regulations and guidelines for healthcare and social assistance:

3. Transportation and Warehousing

The long, hard, lonely hours make transportation and warehouse workers prone to dealing with exhaustion, mental disorders or syndromes and road accidents.

These are some of the most dangerous jobs within these industries:

  • Oil field driving
  • Bus and truck mechanics
  • Diesel engine maintenance
  • Long-haul trucking
  • Material moving

Here are the Canadian safety regulations and guidelines for transportation and warehousing:

2. Construction

Long known to be a dangerous trade, construction work requires the use of heavy equipment and power tools every day. Other risks workers in this field deal with include slipping, falling from heights, getting heat stroke and having caught-in or struck-by accidents. Canadian workers may also find themselves confronted by large animals (bear, moose, etc.). 

These are some of the most dangerous jobs within these industries:

  • Sewer and duct construction
  • Demolition
  • High-rise construction
  • Concrete work
  • Crane operations
  • Roofing
  • Structural iron and steel framing
  • Electrical 
  • Welding

Here are the Canadian safety regulations and guidelines for construction:

1. Agriculture, Forestry and Fishing and Hunting

For the top spot, the risks of this industry include heavy equipment, dangerous animals, falling trees and an inherently dangerous natural environment. Drownings and traumatic injuries happen but the biggest danger is nervous system and sense organ diseases. 

These are some of the most dangerous jobs within these industries:

  • Industrial tractor operation
  • Livestock management
  • Commercial fishing
  • Logging

Here are the Canadian safety regulations and guidelines for agriculture, forestry and fishing and hunting:

The Most Dangerous Jobs in Canada During COVID-19 

The worldwide COVID-19 pandemic that began in 2020 has made an impact on the statistics regarding the most dangerous jobs in Canada

UNI recently named long-term care work as the most dangerous job in Canada, the US, Australia, Ireland and the UK. From March 2020 to March 2021, hundreds of thousands of Canadian long-term care workers contracted COVID-19 and at least 25 died as a result. 

Monitor and Optimise Your Global Supply Chain

Avetta understands the risks you and your workers deal with every day. With our help, you can transform your supply chain network through transparency, risk management and trust. When workplaces use the Avetta ConnectTM Platform, they find the number of safety incidents is reduced by as much as 55% compared to industry averages.
 

Request a demo to learn how Avetta can help you monitor and optimise your global supply chain and make the most dangerous jobs in Canada a little safer.

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